Wk 3 Annotated Bibliography (Kim Woods Only) Due In 1 Day Read all pages carefully, selected topic, intro & must be follow format according to Sample Paper

Read all pages carefully, selected topic, intro & must be follow format according to Sample Paper (3-3 Para each Article)            

Must be 100% Original       

     
I hv already attached Articles, u must be use this 3 articles for Annotated Bibliography 

Wk 3 Discussion (Due in 1 day) Urgent/..Wk 3 Discussion (Required Assignment) Urgent due in 1 day.docx


(Must be 4 to 5 Pages)


Reference must be write according to APA 7TH

Must be 100% Original Work Assignment must be follow Rubric Superior Criteria

Plz read My Note, Important tips (Wrote on 2nd Page) and also sample paper attached.

Must be use attached Three Article

NOTE: I hv attached 3 Articles & include each Article have (3 para) three paragraph
summary, Analysis
and
application
to the study.

Selected topic: Sustainable supply chain management in Rosewood trade (Annotated Bibliography must be write on related this topic & Apply)

MY Notes:
(Must see sample paper)

Sample Annotated Bibliography attached so must be follow & minimum 3 pages required & three (3) peer-reviewed sources (no older than 5 years).

(4-5 Pages required )Must be include Abstract/Intro like in sample

Course: DDBA – Doctoral Study Mentoring

Selected topic: Sustainable supply chain management in Rosewood trade

Discussion 2: Annotated Bibliography

In each week of this course, you will research and select three (3) peer-reviewed, scholarly sources to develop an annotated bibliography that you can use in your Doctoral Study. You will need to take the three sources and synthesize the references into a single narrative annotated bibliography that compares/contrasts or supports your study. For example, you may develop three references that will fit into the Nature of the Study (or any other component) and then the synthesized version will help you in developing your Prospectus/Proposal. Please see this week’s Learning Resources for the Sample Annotated Bibliography Template, which you should use to complete your annotated bibliography.

By Day 3

Post your synthesized annotated bibliography narrative that includes an explanation of how these references relate to one or more components of your Doctoral Study and incorporates specific references to the Doctoral Study Rubric.

Refer to the Week 3 Discussion 2 Rubric for specific grading elements and criteria. Your Instructor will use this rubric to assess your work.

Important tips: Include each Article annotated bibliography have three paragraph summary, Analysis and applies to the study

Walden’s recommendations for formatting an AB includes three areas, typically formatted in three paragraphs: 

This first paragraph of the annotation summarizes the source. It outlines the main findings and primary methods of the study.

Summary: What did the author do? Why? What did he/she find?

This second paragraph of the annotation analyzes the source. It explains the benefits of the source but also the limitations.

Analysis: Was the author’s method sound? What information was missing? Is this a scholarly source?

This third paragraph of the annotation applies the source. It explains how the source’s ideas, research, and information can be applied to other contexts.

Application: Does this article apply to the literature? How would you be able to apply this method/study to your particular study? Is the article universal?

In general, annotated bibliographies should avoid referring to the first or second person (I, me, my, we, our, you, and us). Instead, students should aim to be objective and remove themselves from annotations. However, there may be some exceptions to this guideline. Check with your instructor if you are unsure about whether he/she will allow you to use “I” in your annotated bibliography.

Must be use Below Three Article for Annotated Bibliography & related intro & topic

Kansanga, M. M., Dinko, D. H., Nyantakyi-Frimpong, H., Arku, G., & Luginaah, I. (2021). Scalar politics and black markets: The political ecology of illegal rosewood logging in Ghana. Geoforum, 119, 83–93. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2020.12.020

Nijman, V., Siriwat, P., & Shepherd, C. R. (2022). Inaccuracies in the reporting of volume and monetary value of large-scale rosewood seizures. Forest Policy and Economics, 134, 102626. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.forpol.2021.102626

Wainwright, J. D., & Zempel, C. L. (2017). The colonial roots of forest extraction: Rosewood exploitation in southern Belize. Development and Change, 49(1), 37–62. https://doi.org/10.1111/dech.12357

(Kansanga et al., 2021)

(Nijman et al., 2022)

(Wainwright & Zempel, 2017)

Assignment must be follow Rubric Superior Criteria

Rubric Detail

 

 

Superior

Excellent

Satisfactory

Marginal

Unsatisfactory

Not Submitted

Element 1: Annotated Bibliography (post and attach document)

6.6 (30%)

Student posts and includes an attachment of his/her annotated bibliography which includes three peer-reviewed, scholarly sources that are thoroughly synthesized into a single, well-written narrative annotated bibliography that explicitly compares/contrasts or supports his/her study. A thorough and detailed explanation of how the sources relate to his/her study is evident.

6.27 (28.5%)

Student posts and includes an attachment of his/her annotated bibliography which includes three peer-reviewed, scholarly sources that are thoroughly synthesized into a single, well-written narrative annotated bibliography that explicitly compares/contrasts or supports his/her study. A detailed explanation of how the sources relate to his/her study is evident. One or two minor details are missing or lack clarity.

5.61 (25.5%)

Student posts and includes an attachment of his/her annotated bibliography which includes three peer-reviewed, scholarly sources that are synthesized into a single narrative annotated bibliography that explicitly compares/contrasts or supports his/her study. An explanation with some details of how the sources relate to his/her study is evident.

4.95 (22.5%)

Student posts and includes an attachment of his/her annotated bibliography which includes three peer-reviewed, scholarly sources that are somewhat synthesized into a single narrative annotated bibliography that compares/contrasts or supports his/her study. A cursory statement of how the sources relate to his/her study is evident.

3.3 (15%)

Does not meet minimal standards and/or is posted late.

(0%)

Did not submit element.

Element 2: Follow-up Responses

8.8 (40%)

On Day 5 and on Day 7, student’s responses fully contribute to the quality of interaction by offering constructive critique, suggestions, in-depth questions, and/or additional resources related to peers’ annotated bibliography. Student demonstrates active engagement with more than one peer on at least two days in the discussion forum (or with Instructor if there are no other peers/posts).

8.36 (38%)

On Day 5 and on Day 7, student shares some constructive critique, suggestions, in-depth questions, and/or additional resources related to peers’ annotated bibliography, but more depth and/or clarity around ideas is needed. Student demonstrates active engagement with more than one peer on at least two days in the discussion forum (or with Instructor if there are no other peers/posts).

7.48 (34%)

Student did not post on Day 5 and on Day 7, but he/she did engage with at least one peer (or with Instructor if there are no other peers/posts) during the week offering constructive feedback related to peers’ annotated bibliography.

6.6 (30%)

Student posts to at least one peer (or with Instructor if there are no other peers/posts) but response is cursory and/or off topic.

4.4 (20%)

Does not meet minimal standards and/or student posted late.

(0%)

Did not submit element.

Element 3: Written Delivery Style & Grammar

3.3 (15%)

Student consistently follows APA writing style and basic rules of formal English grammar and written essay style. Student communicates in a cohesive, logical style. There are no spelling or grammar errors.

3.13 (14.25%)

Student consistently follows APA writing style and basic rules of formal English grammar and written essay style. Student communicates in a cohesive, logical style. There are one or two minor errors in spelling or grammar.

2.81 (12.75%)

Student mostly follows APA writing style and basic rules of formal English grammar and written essay style. Student mostly communicates in a cohesive, logical style. There are some errors in spelling or grammar.

2.48 (11.25%)

Student does not follow APA writing style and basic rules of formal English grammar and written essay style and does not communicate in a cohesive, logical style.

1.65 (7.5%)

Does not meet minimal standards.

(0%)

Did not submit element.

Element 4: Formal and Appropriate Documentation of Evidence, Attribution of Ideas (APA Citations)

3.3 (15%)

Student demonstrates full adherence to scholarly reference requirements and adheres to APA style with respect to source attribution, references, heading and subheading logic, table of contents and lists of charts, etc. There are no APA errors.

3.13 (14.25%)

Student demonstrates full adherence to scholarly reference requirements and adheres to APA style with respect to source attribution, references, heading and subheading logic, table of contents and lists of charts, etc. There are one or two minor errors in APA style or format.

2.81 (12.75%)

Student mostly adheres to scholarly reference requirements and/or mostly adheres to APA style with respect to source attribution, references, heading and subheading logic, table of contents and lists of charts, etc. Some errors in APA format and style are evident.

2.48 (11.25%)

Student demonstrates weak or inconsistent adherence scholarly reference requirements and/or weak or inconsistent adherence to APA style with respect to source attribution, references, heading and subheading logic, table of contents and lists of charts, etc. Several errors in APA format and style are evident.

1.65 (7.5%)

Does not meet minimal standards.

(0%)

Did not submit element.

Wk 3 Discussion (Due in 1 day) Urgent/.Sample_Annotated_Bibliography.doc

PAGE

1

Sample Annotated Bibliography

Student Name Here

Walden University

Sample Annotated Bibliography

Autism
research continues to grapple with activities that best serve the purpose of fostering positive interpersonal relationships for children who struggle with autism. Children have benefited from therapy sessions that provide ongoing activities to aid autistic children’s ability to engage in healthy social interactions. However, less is known about how K–12 schools might implement programs for this group of individuals to provide additional opportunities for growth, or even if and how school programs would be of assistance in the end. There is a gap, then, in understanding the possibilities of implementing such programs in schools to foster the social and thus mental health of children with autism.

Annotated Bibliography

Kenny
, M. C., Dinehart, L. H., & Winick, C. B. (2016). Child-centered play therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder. In A. A. Drewes & C. E. Schaefer (Eds.), Play therapy in middle childhood (pp. 103–147). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

In this chapter, Kenny, Dinehart, and Winick provided a case study of the treatment of a 10-year-old boy diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ADS). Kenny et al. described the rationale and theory behind the use of child-centered play therapy (CCPT) in the treatment of a child with ASD. Specifically, children with ADS often have sociobehavioral problems that can be improved when they have a safe therapy space for expressing themselves emotionally through play that assists in their interpersonal development. The authors outlined the progress made by the patient in addressing the social and communicative impairments associated with ASD. Additionally, the authors explained the role that parents have in implementing CCPT in the patient’s treatment. Their research on the success of CCPT used qualitative data collected by observing the patient in multiple therapy sessions
.

CCPT follows research carried out by other theorists who have identified the role of play in supporting cognition and interpersonal relationships. This case study is relevant to the current conversation surrounding the emerging trend toward CCPT treatment in adolescents with ASD as it illustrates how CCPT can be successfully implemented in a therapeutic setting to improve the patient’s communication and socialization skills. However, Kenny et al. acknowledged that CCPT has limitations—children with ADS, who are not highly functioning and or are more severely emotionally underdeveloped, are likely not suited for this type of therapy
.

Kenny et al.’s explanation of this treatments’s implementation is useful for professionals in the psychology field who work with adolescents with ASD. This piece is also useful to parents of adolescents with ASD, as it discusses the role that parents can play in successfully implementing the treatment. However, more information is needed to determine if this program would be suitable as part of a K–12 school program focused on the needs of children with ASD
.

Stagmitti, K. (2016). Play therapy for school-age children with high-functioning autism. In A.A. Drewes and C. E. Schaefer (Eds.), Play therapy in middle cildhood (pp. 237–255). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Stagmitti discussed how the Learn to Play program fosters the social and personal development of children who have high functioning autism. The program is designed as a series of play sessions carried out over time, each session aiming to help children with high functioning autism learn to engage in complex play activities with their therapist and on their own. The program is beneficial for children who are 1- to 8-years old if they are already communicating with others both nonverbally and verbally. Through this program, the therapist works with autistic children by initiating play activities, helping children direct their attention to the activity, eventually helping them begin to initiate play on their own by moving past the play narrative created by the therapist and adding new, logical steps in the play scenario themselves. The underlying rationale for the program is that there is a link between the ability of children with autism to create imaginary play scenarios that are increasingly more complex and the development of emotional well-being and social skills in these children. Study results from the program have shown that the program is successful: Children have developed personal and social skills of several increment levels in a short time. While Stagmitti provided evidence that the Learn to Play program was successful, she also acknowledged that more research was needed to fully understand the long-term benefits of the program.

Stagmitti offered an insightful overview of the program; however, her discussion was focused on children identified as having high-functioning autism, and, therefore, it is not clear if and how this program works for those not identified as high-functioning. Additionally, Stagmitti noted that the program is already initiated in some schools but did not provide discussion on whether there were differences or similarities in the success of this program in that setting.

Although Stagmitti’s overview of the Learn to Play program was helpful for understanding the possibility for this program to be a supplementary addition in the K–12 school system, more research is needed to understand exactly how the program might be implemented, the benefits of implementation, and the drawbacks. Without this additional information, it would be difficult for a researcher to use Stigmitti’s research as a basis for changes in other programs. However, it does provide useful context and ideas that researchers can use to develop additional research programs.

Wimpory, D. C., & Nash, S. (1999). Musical interaction therapy–Therapeutic play for children with autism. Child Language and Teaching Therapy, 15(1), 17–28. doi:10.1037/14776-014

Wimpory and Nash provided a case study for implementing music interaction therapy as part of play therapy aimed at cultivating communication skills in infants with ASD. The researchers based their argument on films taken of play-based therapy sessions that introduced music interaction therapy. To assess the success of music play, Wimpory and Nash filmed the follow-up play-based interaction between the parent and the child. The follow-up interactions revealed that 20 months after the introduction of music play, the patient developed prolonged playful interaction with both the psychologist and the parent. The follow-up films also revealed that children initiated spontaneously pretend play during these later sessions. After the introduction of music, the patient began to develop appropriate language skills.

Since the publication date for this case study is 1999, the results are dated. Although this technique is useful, emerging research in the field has undoubtedly changed in the time since the article was published. Wimpory and Nash wrote this article for a specific audience, including psychologists and researchers working with infants diagnosed with ASD. This focus also means that other researchers beyond these fields may not find the researcher’s findings applicable.

This research is useful to those looking for background information on the implementation of music into play-based therapy in infants with ASD. Wimpory and Nash presented a basis for this technique and outlined its initial development. Thus, this case study can be useful in further trials when paired with more recent research.

�The format of an annotated bibliography can change depending on the assignment and instructor preference, but the typical format for an annotated bibliography in academic writing is a list of reference entries with each entry followed by an annotation (hence the name, “annotated bibliography”).

However, APA does not have specific rules or guidelines for annotated bibliographies, so be sure to ask your instructor for any course-specific requirements that may vary from the general format.

�An introduction is a helpful addition to your annotated bibliography to tell your reader (a) your topic and focus for your research and (b) the general context of your topic.

Although your assignment instructions may not explicitly ask for an introduction, your instructor might expect you to include one. If you are not sure, be sure to ask your instructor.

�Use a Level 1 heading titled “Annotated Bibliography” or any other wording your instructor has given you to indicate to your reader that the annotations will go next and separate this section from the introduction paragraph above.

�Format your reference entries per APA, as well as follow APA style when writing your paragraphs. However, as mentioned above, this is the extent of the formatting requirements APA has for annotated bibliographies.

The content of the paragraphs and how many paragraphs you include in each annotation follows academic writing conventions, your assignment guidelines, and your instructor preferences.

�This first paragraph of the annotation summarizes the source. It outlines the main findings and primary methods of the study.

�This second paragraph of the annotation analyzes the source. It explains the benefits of the source but also the limitations.

�This third paragraph of the annotation applies the source. It explains how the source’s ideas, research, and information can be applied to other contexts.

In general, annotated bibliographies should avoid referring to the first or second person (I, me, my, we, our, you, and us). Instead, students should aim to be objective and remove themselves from annotations. However, there may be some exceptions to this guideline. Check with your instructor if you are unsure about whether he/she will allow you to use “I” in your annotated bibliography.

Wk 3 Discussion (Due in 1 day) Urgent/Inaccuracies in the reporting of volume and monetary.pdf

Forest Policy and Economics 134 (2022) 102626

Available online 30 October 2021
1389-9341/© 2021 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Inaccuracies in the reporting of volume and monetary value of large-scale
rosewood seizures

Vincent Nijman a, Penthai Siriwat a, *, Chris R. Shepherd b

a Oxford Wildlife Trade Research Group, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane, OX3 0BP Oxford, UK
b Monitor Conservation Research Society (Monitor), Box 200, Big Lake Ranch, B.C. V0L 1G0, Canada

A R T I C L E I N F O

Keywords
China
CITES
Dalbergia
Forestry management
Hongmu
Illegal wildlife trade

A B S T R A C T

It is increasingly realised that for a proper understanding of the illegal aspects of the international timber trade
sound data on seizures is needed. Their value, however, may be greatly diminished in the absence of accurate
reporting. International trade in rosewood is regulated through CITES, with large amounts trafficked illegally,
and annually thousands of seizures are made. Unfamiliarity with the differences between ton and tonne as a unit
of mass —the former equalling 907 kg and the latter 1000 kg and this is unrelated to US vs UK English spelling—
has led to misreporting. Only the tonne is accepted by the Système international (and given the symbol t). Eighty-
three independent reports of 19 large-scale rosewood seizures from nine countries (2013− 2021) referred to mass
in tonnes 48 times and in tons 35 times, without any conversion having taken place. The monetary value of
rosewood in these seizures differed US$3246 t− 1 depending on whether ton or tonnes were used. Accurate
reporting and conversion of mass to the same unit there where needed is especially relevant when presenting
aggregate analyses of the illegal timber trade.

1. Introduction

In terms of monetary value, the legal timber trade is the most
important aspect of the global wildlife trade. In 2019 it was valued at
~US$244 billion year− 1, with fisheries coming second at ~US$151
year− 1 (Nijman, 2021). When it comes to the illegal wildlife trade the
monetary value is difficult to establish (t’ Sas-Rolfes et al. (2019) gives a
range of US$7–21 billion year− 1) but according to the United Nations
Office of Drugs and Crime timber comprises 44.7% of the total value of
seized wildlife, compared to for instance 5.5% for rhinos and rhino horn
(UNODC, 2020). For proper management of forestry resources and in
order to regulate legal international trade, it is important to have a
sound understanding of the illegal aspects of this trade, especially in
times of crisis. The illegal wildlife trade, the regulation of international
legal trade in high-value timbers, corruption, and how this affects on-
the-ground management has received increased attention in recent
years (Chimeli et al., 2012; Lowe et al., 2016; Dumenu, 2019; Fukush-
ima et al., 2020). Seizure data are a vital source of information to gain
these insights. But their value may be greatly diminished in the absence
of accurate reporting. Under-reporting or not reporting at all, double
counting, using incorrect measurements, inappropriate grouping of

unrelated items / species, and the use of unrealistic, often inflated,
prices have been flagged up as issues that lessen the veracity of illegal
trade and seizure reports (cf. Broad et al., 2002; Nijman, 2014; Phelps
and Webb, 2015). It has also been noted that getting one’s units right is
vital, be it when reporting on wildlife trade, when sending rockets to
Mars or when modelling sea surface temperatures (e.g., Chan et al.,
2019; Shepherd and Nijman, 2021).

The rosewoods are a group of tree species that are affected by un-
regulated and illegal trade (Wenbin and Xiufang, 2013; Ratsimbazafy
et al., 2016; Waeber et al., 2019; Wilmé et al., 2020). In the timber trade,
rosewoods or hongmu (meaning ‘red wood’ in Mandarin) mostly refers
to a list of 33 species from five genera (Dalbergia, Pterocarpus, Diospyros,
Cassia and Millitia) with a global distribution. Hongmu is characterised
by a unique, deep-red colouring, aromatic scent and excellent durability.
Over the last decade, the demand for rosewood to be used in the pro-
duction of luxurious furniture in China and Vietnam has led to an in-
crease in global trade.

Recognising the threat that international trade pose to rosewoods,
the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild
Fauna and Flora (CITES) has implemented a series of decisions con-
cerning rosewood, including the listing of all Dalbergia species in its

* Corresponding author at: Oxford Wildlife Trade Research Group, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane, OX3 0BP Oxford, UK.
E-mail address: siriwat.penthai@gmail.com (P. Siriwat).

Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

Forest Policy and Economics

journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/forpol

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.forpol.2021.102626
Received 6 August 2021; Received in revised form 12 October 2021; Accepted 15 October 2021

Forest Policy and Economics 134 (2022) 102626

2

Appendix II, thereby regulating international trade (Brazilian rosewood
D. nigra is listed on Appendix I, precluding international trade). The
rampant unregulated logging in 2000s, combined with domestic civil
unrest shined a particular spotlight on the impact and lasting conse-
quence of unregulated rosewood logging in Madagascar (Waeber et al.,
2018; Waeber et al., 2019). At present, the issue surrounding the
stockpile management of Malagasy rosewood still remains highly con-
tested (Waeber et al., 2018; Wilmé and Waeber, 2019). Consequences of
rosewood deforestation targeting developing nations have also spread
elsewhere; in Ghana, despite comprehensive ban on rosewood logging
implemented in March 2019, there have been persistent illegal extrac-
tion of rosewood with complex links to political and governance issues
(Kansanga et al., 2021), while in Senegal, situation of illegal logging in
the region of Casamance forests has led several international NGOs to
lodge a criminal complaint before the Swiss War Crimes Unit (EIA, 2020;
Martini and Sarliève, 2021).

Unbeknownst to many, as a unit of mass, there are three types of
tons, viz. the tonne, the short ton, and the long ton. The tonne, used in
most of the world, equals 1000.0 kg; it is also referred to as a metric
tonne or a metric ton. The short ton, frequently used in the USA, equals
2000 pounds or 907.2 kg. The long ton, used in the UK and other
Commonwealth Nations that continue to use the Imperial system, equals
160 stone or 2240 pounds, and this equals 1016.0 kg. Note that these
conversions are based the Imperial pound equalling 454 g, whereas
countries where Germanic languages other than English are spoken, a
‘Pfund’, ‘pond’, ‘pund’, etc. equals 500 g. Only the tonne is accepted by
the Système international and should be abbreviated as a t (the official SI
unit is megagram, Mg). The long ton and the short ton are not accepted
by the SI. A ton or a tonne is not related to US / American English and UK
/ British English spelling, and tonnes is not the plural of ton.

In addition to being a measure of mass, the ton is also a unit of
volume, such as the freight ton used commonly in the USA for
(container) shipments in large vehicles, trains or ships, or the cubic ton.
The freight ton has a volume of 1.133 m3 and for rosewood the cubic ton
e

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