Management Information Systèmes Hello, I’m doing BBA of business administration, I have an assessment  to make for Tomorrow  in management Information syst

Management Information Systèmes Hello, I’m doing BBA of business administration, I have an assessment  to make for Tomorrow  in management Information systmèmes  . in attachment you will find the details of the assessment. Thank you BCO216 Management Information Systems Midterm Task brief & rubrics

Individual Task

This will be an individual assessment. Students must read the following case and elaborate a document answering the questions at the end:

Border’s ERP Case.

Border States Industries Inc., also known as Border States Electric (BSE), is a wholesale distributor for the construction, industrial, utility, and data communications

markets. The company is headquartered in Fargo, North Dakota, and has 57 sales offices in states along the U.S. borders with Canada and Mexico as well as in South

Dakota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Missouri. BSE has 1,400 employees and is wholly employee-owned through its employee stock ownership plan. For the fiscal year ending

March 31, 2008, BSE earned revenues of over US $880 million. BSE’s goal is to provide customers with what they need whenever they need it, including providing

custom services beyond delivery of products.

Thus, the company is not only a wholesale distributor but also a provider of supply chain solutions, with extensive service operations such as logistics, job-site trailers,

and kitting (packaging individually separate but related items together as one unit). BSE has distribution agreements with more than 9,000 product vendors. BSE had

relied on its own legacy ERP system called Rigel since 1988 to support its core business processes. However, Rigel had been designed exclusively for electrical

wholesalers, and by the mid-1990s, the system could not support BSE’s new lines of business and extensive growth. At that point, BSE’s management decided to

implement a new ERP system and selected the enterprise software from SAP AG. The ERP solution included SAP’s modules for sale s and distribution, materials

management, financials and controlling, and human resources. BSE initially budgeted $6 million for the new system, with a start date of November 1, 1998.

Senior management worked with IBM and SAP consulting to implement the system. Although close involvement of management was one key ingredient in the systems’

success, day-to-day operations suffered while managers were working on the project. BSE also decided to customize the system extensively. It wrote its own software to

enable the ERP system to interface automatically with systems from other vendors, including Taxware Systems, Inc., Innovis Inc., and TOPCALL International GmbH. The

Taxware system enabled BSE to comply with the sales tax requirements of all the states and municipalities where it conducts business. The Innovis system supported

electronic data interchange (EDI) so that BSE could electronically exchange purchase and payment transactions with its suppl iers.

The TOPCALL system enabled BSE to fax customers and vendors directly from the SAP system. At the time of this im plementation, BSE had no experience with SAP

software, and few consultants familiar with the version of the SAP software that BSE was using. Instead of adopting the best-practice business processes embedded in

the SAP software, BSE hired consultants to further customize the SAP software to make its new SAP system look like its old Rigel system in certain areas. For example, it

tried to make customer invoices resemble the invoices produced by the old Rigel system.

Implementing these changes required so much customization of the SAP software that BSE had to delay the launch date for the new ERP system until February 1, 1999.

By that time, continued customization and tuning raised total implementation costs to $9 million (an increase of 50 percent). Converting and cleansing data from BSE’s

legacy system took far longer than management had anticipated. The first group of “expert users” were trained too early in the project and had to be retrained when

the new system finally went live. BSE never fully tested the system as it would be used in a working production environment before the system actually went live. For

the next five years, BSE continued to use its SAP ERP system successfully as it acquired several small companies and expanded its branch office infrastructure to 24

states. As the business grew further, profits and inventory turns increased.

However, the Internet brought about the need for additional changes, as customers sought to transact business with BSE through an e-commerce storefront. BSE

automated online credit card processing and special pricing agreements (SPAs) with designated customers. Unfortunately, the existing SAP software did not support

these changes, so the company had to process thousands of SPAs manually. To process a credit card transaction in a branch office, BSE employees had to leave their

desks, walk over to a dedicated credit card processing system in the back office, manually enter the credit card numbers, wai t for transaction approval, and then return

to their workstations to continue processing sales transactions.

In 2004, BSE began upgrading its ERP system to a more recent version of the SAP software. The software included new support f or bills of material and kitting, which

were not available in the old system. This functionality enabled BSE to provide better support to utility customers because it could prepare kits that could be delivered

directly to a site. This time the company kept customization to a minimum and used the SAP best practices for wholesale distribution embedded in the software. It also

replaced TOPCALL with software from Esker for faxing and emailing outbound invoices, order acknowledgments, and purchase orders and added capabilities from Vistex

Inc. to automate SPA rebate claims processing.

BSE processes over 360,000 SPA claims each year, and the Vistex software enabled BSE to reduce rebate fulfilment time to 72 hours and transaction processing time by

63 percent. In the past, it took 15 to 30 days for BSE to receive rebates from vendors. BSE budgeted $1.6 million and 4.5 months for implementation, which

management believed was sufficient for a project of this magnitude. This time there were no problems. The new system went live on its target date and cost only $1.4

million to implement—14 percent below budget. In late 2006, BSE acquired a large company that was anticipated to increase sales volume by 20 percent each year. This

acquisition added 19 new branches to BSE.

These new branches were able to run BSE’s SAP software within a day after the acquisition had been completed. BSE now tracks 1.5 million unique items with the

software. Since BSE first deployed SAP software in 1998, sales have increased 300 percent, profits have climbed more than 500 percent, 60 percent of accounts payable

transactions take place electronically using EDI, and SPA processing has been reduced by 63 percent. The company turns over its inventory more than four times per

year. Instead of waiting 15 to 20 days for monthly financial statements, monthly and year-to-date financial results are available within a day after closing the books.

Manual work for handling incoming mail, preparing bank deposits, and taking checks physically to the bank has been significantly reduced. Over 60 percent of vendor

invoices arrive electronically, which has reduced staff size in accounts payable and the number of transaction errors. Transaction costs are lower. The number of full-

time BSE employees did increase in the information systems area to support the SAP software. BSE had initially expected to have 3 IT staff supporting the system, but

needed 8 people when the first ERP implementation went live in 1999 and 11 by 2006 to support additional SAP software and the new acquisition. BSE’s information

technology (IT) costs rose by approximately $3 million per year after the first SAP implementation. However, sales expanded during the same period, so the increased

overhead for the system produced a cost increase of only .5 percent of total sales. BSE management has pointed out that much of the work that was automated by the

ERP systems has been in the accounting department and involved activities that were purely transactional. This has freed up r esources for adding more employees who

work directly with customers trying to reduce costs and increase sales. In the past, BSE had maintained much of its data outside its major corporate systems using PC-

based Microsoft Access database and Excel spreadsheet software. Management lacked a single company-wide version of corporate data because the data were

fragmented into so many different systems. Now the company is standardized on one common platform and the information is always current and available to

management. Management can obtain a picture of how the entire business is performing at any moment in time. Since the SAP system makes all of BSE’s planning and

budgeting data available online, management is able to make better and quicker decisions. In 2006, Gartner Group Consultants performed an independent evaluation of

BSE’s ERP implementation.

Gartner interviewed top executives and analysed BSE data on the impact of the ERP system on BSE’s business process costs, using costs as a percentage of sales as its

final metric for assessing the financial impact of SAP software. Cost categories analyzed included costs of goods sold, overhead and administration, warehousing costs, IT

support, and delivery. Gartner’s analysis validated that the SAP software implementation cost from 1998 to 2001 did indeed total $9 million and that this investment

was paid back by savings from the new ERP system within 2.5 years. Between 1998 and 2006, the SAP software implemented by BSE produced total savings of $30

million, approximately one-third of BSE’s cumulative earnings during the same period.

As a percentage of sales, warehouse costs went down 1 percent, delivery costs decreased by .5 percent, and total overhead costs declined by 1.5 percent. Gartner

calculated the total return on investment (ROI) for the project between 1998 and 2006 was $3.3 million per year, or 37 percent of the original investment. BSE is now

focusing on providing more support for Internet sales, including online ordering, inventory, order status, and invoice review, all within a SAP software environment.

The company implemented SAP NetWeaver Master Data Management to provide tools to manage and maintain catalog data and prepare the data for publication online

and in traditional print media. The company is using SAP’s Web Dynpro development environment to enable wireless warehouse and inventory management activities

to interact with the SAP software. And it is using SAP NetWeaver Business Intelligence software to learn more about customers, their buying habits, and opportunities to

cross-sell and upsell products.

Questions:

1. What problems was Border States Industries encountering as it expanded? How much did the new system solution transform the business?

2. Evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the implemented solution.

3. How successful was this solution for BSE? Identify and describe the metrics used to measure the success of the solution and discuss the implementation
strategy and processes.

Formalities:

• Wordcount: 600 words

• Cover, Table of Contents, References and Appendix are excluded of the total wordcount.

• Font: Arial 12,5 pts.

• Text alignment: Justified.

• The in-text References and the Bibliography must be in Harvard’s citation style.

Submission: November 28th 23:59 (Week 9) – Via Moodle (Turnitin).

Weight: This task is a 30% of your total grade for this subject.

It assesses the following learning outcomes:

• Understand what an information system is and its main components.
• Distinguish between the main types of information systems and innovative methods of reducing costs and improving service through management information systems.
• Assess challenges related to (1) the adoption of new technology by employees and customers, and (2) the implementation strategy and processes.
• Discuss ethical, privacy and security issues related to the use of data and technology in today’s business environment.

Rubrics

Exceptional 90-100 Good 80-89 Fair 70-79 Marginal fail 60-69

Knowledge &
Understanding

(20%)

Student demonstrates
excellent understanding of
key concepts and uses
vocabulary in an entirely
appropriate manner.

Student demonstrates
good understanding of the
task and mentions some
relevant concepts and
demonstrates use of the
relevant vocabulary.

Student understands the
task and provides minimum
theory and/or some use of
vocabulary.

Student understands the task
and attempts to answer the
question but does not
mention key concepts or uses
minimum amount of relevant
vocabulary.

Application (30%) Student applies fully
relevant knowledge from
the topics delivered in
class.

Student applies mostly
relevant knowledge from
the topics delivered in
class.

Student applies some
relevant knowledge from
the topics delivered in
class. Misunderstanding
may be evident.

Student applies little relevant
knowledge from the topics
delivered in class.
Misunderstands are evident.

Critical Thinking
(30%)

Student critically assesses
in excellent ways, drawing
outstanding conclusions
from relevant authors.

Student critically assesses
in good ways, drawing
conclusions from relevant
authors and references.

Student provides some
insights but stays on the
surface of the topic.
References may not be
relevant.

Student makes little or none
critical thinking insights, does
not quote appropriate
authors, and does not
provide valid sources.

Communication
(20%)

Student communicates
their ideas extremely
clearly and concisely,
respecting word count,
grammar and spellcheck

Student communicates
their ideas clearly and
concisely, respecting word
count, grammar and
spellcheck

Student communicates
their ideas with some
clarity and concision. It
may be slightly over or
under the wordcount limit.
Some misspelling errors
may be evident.

Student communicates their
ideas in a somewhat unclear
and unconcise way. Does not
reach or does exceed
wordcount excessively and
misspelling errors are
evident.

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