Final Discussion 5 Pages Including Title And APA Format References (Minimum 800 Words) Ethical Application Paper- Topic- HealthCare Workers  5 pages Inclu

Final Discussion 5 Pages Including Title And APA Format References (Minimum 800 Words) Ethical Application Paper- Topic- HealthCare Workers 

5 pages Including Title and APA Format References (Minimum 800 Words)

Select a recent (within five years) corporate or political ethical issue/event, or a corporate social responsibility issue.  You will share your choice of topic with your instructor in week three of the eight-week course and week six in the 16-week course. Conduct in-depth review and research on your chosen topic.  If you choose an ethical issues or event: Briefly describe the situation (one page) then analyze the situation and show what effect the decisions made have on the organization, the stakeholders, and the public. Determine how the situation could have been handled within the bounds of known ethical standards and summarize what you have learned about your own ethical standards from this study.  If you choose a corporate social responsibility (CSR) issue:  Briefly describe the CSR issue (one page) then analyze the situation and show what effect the decisions made have on the organization, the stakeholders, and the public.  Determine how the situation could have been handled within the bounds of changing CSR standards and summarize what you have learned about your own view of CSR from this study.  The length of the paper shall be at least 5 pages (not including cover, abstract, and reference list).  Your reference list should include at least five (5) scholarly journals (use library database such as EBSCO).  Be sure to include proper citation and/or quotation according to the APA format. HELP ME PLEASE, I’M BEING BULLIED
DR. STELLA MARIE ROSTKOWSKI
UNION COLLEGE

AGENDA
Discuss Workplace Bullying
Discuss Why Workplace Bullying Occurs
Discuss Hierarchal Bullying
Discuss Lateral Bullying
Discuss Psychological Effects of being Bullied

ABSTRACT
Workplace bullying is not a new concept, but rather one that has been kept quiet in the workplace and serves as a way to cause “severe social, psychological, and psychosomatic problems” (Einarsen, Hoel, Zapf, & Cooper, 2011, p.4) for the person being targeted. Research showed that the implied, intended outcome was to eliminate the injured employee from the workplace through whatever means possible (Einarsen, Hoel, & Notelaers, 2009; Sloan et al., 2010; Rugulies, 2012), which included both physical and mental harassment (Devonish, 2013; Glasø, Vie, Holmadal, & Einarsen, 2011) of the person being targeted, social exclusion (Appelbaum, Semerjian, & Mohan, 2012; Fevre et al., 2013), and “verbal abuse, accusations, and public humiliation” (Hauge, Skogstad, & Einarsen, 2010, p. 427).

BULLYING
Research revealed that workplace bullying is not a new concept, but rather one that has been kept quiet in the workplace and serves as a way to cause “severe social, psychological, and psychosomatic problems” (Einarsen, Hoel, Zapf, & Cooper, 2011, p.4) for the person being targeted. Research showed that the implied, intended outcome was to eliminate the injured employee from the workplace through whatever means possible (Einarsen, Hoel, & Notelaers, 2009; Sloan et al., 2010; Rugulies, 2012), which included both physical and mental harassment (Devonish, 2013; Glasø, Vie, Holmadal, & Einarsen, 2011) of the person being targeted, social exclusion (Appelbaum, Semerjian, & Mohan, 2012; Fevre et al., 2013), and “verbal abuse, accusations, and public humiliation” (Hauge, Skogstad, & Einarsen, 2010, p. 427).
Research showed if the employee being targeted did not conform to what was deemed the acceptable “social order” (Murray, 2013, p. 112) within the organization, bullying efforts were increased to the extent that the employee being targeted experienced severe mental stress and anguish (Bailien, De Cuyper, & De Witte, 2011; Dae-seok, Gold, & Kim, 2012; Rodriguez-Munoz, Baillien, De-Witte, Moreno-Jimenez, & Pastor, 2009; Nielsen, Hetland, Matthiesen, & Einarsen, 2012; Selenko, & Batinic, 2013), “moral stress” (Murray, 2013, p. 113), increased sick days (O’Reilly & Aquino, 2011), loss of job satisfaction and security (Finne, Knardalh, & Lau, 2011; Houshmand, O’Reilly, Robinson, & Wolff, 2012; McCormack, Casimir, Djurkovic, & Yang, 2009; O’Reilly & Aquino, 2011), and they eventually left the workplace (Berthelsen, Skogstad, Lau, & Einarsen, 2011; D’Cruz & Noronha, 2010; Hogh, Hoel, & Carneiro, 2011).

HIERARCHAL BULLYING
Hierarchal bullying is an “abuse of power” (Schumann, Craig, & Rosu, 2014, p.846), which is directly aimed at forcing the employer’s will onto the employee by getting the employee to submit to what the employer wanted through psychological mind control and manipulation (D’Cruz & Noronha, 2010; De Cuyper, Baillien, & De Witte, 2009; Einarsen et al., 2009; Einarsen et al., 2011; Finne et al., 2011; Schumann et al., 2014).
Hierarchal bullying “encapsulates a series of systematically negative acts that derive into social, psychological, and psychosomatic problems for the victim” (Montes, Muniz, Leal- Rodrguez, & Leal-Millan, 2014, p.2659). Research showed that employer bullying starts with the first bullying action of public and private humiliation (Finne et al., 2011; Gumbus & Lyons, 2011; Hauge et al., 2010). Once the employer had successfully humiliated the employee, efforts were increased to sabotage the employee’s work and discredit the employee with co-workers (Hoefsmit et al., 2013; Hogh et al., 2011; Idris et al., 2014; Law et al., 2011).
Employees who are bullied at work by their managers are often isolated, because other employees fear the same reprimand or fate from management and engage in the bullying efforts in order to avoid being victimized as well (Hoefsmit et al., 2013; Hogh et al., 2011; Idris et al., 2014). According to the Workplace Bullying Institute (2014), hierarchal bullying exists and thrives in the workplace because of fear: Fear of being the next target; fear of not helping correctly and botching it; fear of being the only one from a group to act; fear of retaliation by the bully; fear of loss of one’s job and income. Thus, for coworkers as well as targets themselves, the workplace becomes a fear-plagued environment. (para.7).

EFFECTS OF HIERARCHAL BULLYING
Bullied employee to experience a chain reaction of social, psychological, and psychosomatic symptoms and events in their professional and personal lives (Bartlett & Bartlett, 2011; Glasø, Nielsen, Einarsen, Haugland, & Mattheisen, 2009b; Hauge et al., 2010; Nixon et al., 2011; Tuckey, Dollard, Hosking, & Wienfield, 2009);
Bullied employees feel that the employer-employee work ethic was broken (Nixon et al., 2011; Roscigno et al., 2009; Samnani & Singh, 2012);
Bullied employees experience high amounts of stress that affects them physically and psychologically.
Grinding teeth;
Excessive trips to the bathroom;
Irritable Bowl Syndrome;
Anxiety;
Depression
Dependency on drugs and alcohol &
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD);
Employees who were bullied by their managers have a hard time socially trusting co-workers and colleagues in other positions (Bartlett & Bartlett, 2011; Glasø, Nielsen, & Einarsen, Haugland, & Mattheisen 2009; Hauge et al., 2010; Tuckey et al., 2009).

LATERAL BULLYING
Research showed that work provides social structure, and there is a strong need to be socially accepted at work. Kirsh et al. (2012) and Kronstrom et al. (2011) argued that the importance of human interaction and social organizational acceptance in the workplace has a direct link on employees’ mental and physical health. The social realm is where the bullies begin their attack. It is important to note that the bully will focus their attack on the bullied employees weakness. This provides credibility to the bully’s claims.
Examples of attacks;
Rumors; &
Gossiping.
Once people begin to believe the bullies rumors and gossip, the bully moves to the next phase of their bullying where they cause psychological discord for the bullied employee. The intent of causing psychological discord is to force the bullied employee to focus their attention on the external environment and not their work. After this becomes the social normal for the bullied employee the bully now has proof positive that the injured employee is not doing their job effectively and is concentrating their efforts on other things. This evidence can be taken to the manager, and the bullied employee is questioned about their work habits and productivity. The injured employee now feels that they have to prove they are performing at work in a professional manner. The injured employee begins working more hours, regardless of their injury flaring up.

PSYCHOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF BEING BULLIED AT WOK
Injured employees remember what their lives were like before their injury and feel a sense of loss (Pransky et al., 2012; Spielberger & Reheiser, 2009);
Injured employees blame themselves for being injured.;
Injured employees experience,
Anxiety;
Depression
The effects of continuous bullying in the workplace by both the employer and the co-workers causes the injured employee to be confused because they do not understand why they are being bullied (Glasø et al., 2009; Spielberger & Reheiser, 2009).
The bully continues this pattern until the employee is completely discredited in the eyes of their employer and the smallest of rumors and gossip sends the employee with CTS into panic attacks and “evolutionarily adaptive forms of action” (Vie et al., 2012, p.167), such as the flee or fight response.

CLOSING
Workplace bullying is not a new concept, but rather one that has been kept quiet in the workplace and serves as a way to cause “severe social, psychological, and psychosomatic problems” (Einarsen, Hoel, Zapf, & Cooper, 2011, p.4) for the person being bullied. Through an abuse of power, employers create toxic work environments where bullied employees co-workers are threatened with being bullied and job loss if they do not participate in the bullying.

Research showed that workplace bullying occurs in phases and in each phase the bullying efforts are increased, psychologically and socially with the intent of causing the bullied employee to experience extreme instances of psychological and sociological discomfit and stress that manifest itself physically and psychologically through illness, depression, anxiety, and and “evolutionarily adaptive forms of action” (Vie et al., 2012, p.167), such as the flee or fight response.

QUESTIONS?????

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