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Your time and attention is appreciated!  Thank you Case Study: Leadership Assessment at Robinson Insurance Agency

Todd Robinson, president of Robinson Insurance Agency, couldn’t be happier. The company that Todd’s father, Edger, started thirty years ago is prospering and poised for future growth. Over the past three years, Robinson Insurance has successfully purchased two regional insurance agencies whose owners were ready for retirement. The acquisitions went smoothly, and the firms merged under Todd’s capable leadership. The company now has 13 branch offices, in five different cities, in the greater Portland metropolitan area. The headquarters office—the site of the original Robinson Insurance Agency office—is located in the bustling downtown district in Portland, Oregon.
At 56 years old, Todd Robinson has earned a reputation for being a savvy businessman and a successful entrepreneur. He hopes to acquire at least one other small agency in the next year—a move that will expand the company by two additional branch offices in suburban Portland neighborhoods. However, managing the company is beginning to consume more and more of Todd’s time and energy—time he would like to spend with his family. Todd realizes that he needs to identify potential middle and senior management leaders within the company who can be trained to play a larger role in both day-to-day and strategic decisions.
Todd knows that selecting individuals to fill future leadership positions will be extremely critical to the long-term success of the company. He wants to ensure that the individuals who are identified for growth opportunities have the knowledge, skills and abilities to move into new middle and senior leadership positions as these positions are created. He also wants to ensure that the new leaders will possess and exemplify the “Client First” philosophy that characterizes the company. Frankly, he has concerns that some current managers—especially those from the agencies purchased by Robinson Insurance—may not fully share the company’s values and may only give “lip service” to the company’s customer-oriented values and practices. However, with 13 branch offices, Todd isn’t as familiar with each manger’s potential as he would like to be.
Thus, Todd has retained your services to help plan an assessment-based professional development program. The goal of the program is to identify people within the company who have the potential for greater levels of responsibility and authority, and then to invest in these individuals by providing training and other professional growth opportunities. Todd also wants help creating a succession plan to position the company for long-term success, even after he retires in five to eight years.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER

In a paper of at least 1750 – 2100 words (or 7-8 pages) in length (excluding title, abstract (required) and reference pages),
Describe a comprehensive assessment plan for the company, including a sound defense of the feasibility of the plan, to meet the company’s leadership development objectives. In your paper, address the following: 
1. Discuss the key factors for identifying leadership potential. 
2. Identify an assessment-based approach for identifying potential among the managers at Robinson Insurance Agency. Describe how assessment processes and assessment instruments can be used to identify potential leaders and their leadership development needs. 
3. Include in your assessment approach at least three specific assessment instruments to evaluate leadership potential, justifying the use of each assessment instrument for its intended purpose.
4. Identify the outcomes, data or information produced by each assessment you propose in your plan and review the considerations for facilitating feedback from each type of assessment. 
5. Provide details of practical considerations of your plan, such as who will implement which parts of the assessment plan (an insider, an outsider, or a combination of both), what type of certification may be necessary to administer each assessment, and how the managers within Robinson Insurance will be consulted and involved in the assessment process. 
6. Identify the potential legal ramifications that may arise if Robinson Insurance Agency implements an assessment-based approach to identifying potential. Discuss ways of ensuring that the approach you recommend for the company is legal and justifiable.

You do NOT have to create a training and development plan for the identified future leaders; you only need to detail the assessment component of the plan and describe how the assessment information might be used to design the development activities.

In addition to your Scott and Reynolds (2010) textbook, the assigned articles for the course, and any Internet sources you reference to gather information about the assessments you have chosen, reference at least five additional scholarly sources (academic journal articles) to support your plan.

Recommended Resources

Scott & Reynolds is mandatory
Scott, J. C. & Reynolds, D. H. (Eds.). (2010). Handbook of workplace assessment. Retrieved from https://redshelf.com

Website

National Center for O*NET Development (n.d.). Build your future with O*NET OnLine. Retrieved from
https://www.onetonline.org/ Website for the U.S. Department of Labor/Employment and Training
Administration’s Occupational Information Network (O*NET). The website provides a comprehensive
database of worker attributes and job characteristics. Students can search the website for standard
language and terminology used to describe and define various types of jobs.

Additional Resources

Atwater, L. E., Brett, J. F., & Charles, A. C. (2007). Multi-source feedback: Lessons learned and implications for
practice. Human Resource Management, 46(2), 285-307. https://doi.org/10.1002/hrm.20161

Campion, M., Fink, A., Ruggeberg, B., Carr, L., Phillips, G., & Odman, R. (2011). Doing competencies well: Best
practices in competency modeling. Personnel Psychology, 64(1), 225-262.

Creative Organizational Design, Inc. (COD). (n.d.). Campbell Leadership Index (CLI). Retrieved from
https://www.creativeorgdesign.com/tests_page.php?id=50
This website describes the Campbell
Leadership Index, an assessment that measures characteristics associated with strong leadership
behaviors.

Eisenbraun, G. A. (2006, Feb-March). The pros and cons of personality testing in the workplace. Law Now,
30(4), 17-19.

Goleman, D. [Talks at Google]. (2007, November 12). Daniel Goleman: “Social Intelligence” | Talks at Google.
[Video file]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/-hoo_dIOP8k This YouTube video features Daniel
Goleman speaking on aspects of social and emotional intelligence. *Closed-captioning available.

Gough, H.G. & Bradley, P.. (n.d.). CPI 260 Client Feedback Report . Retrieved from
https://shop.cpp.com/en/cpiproducts.aspx?pc=67

The CPI 260 is a leadership assessment used
widely to help individuals determine leadership strengths and opportunities for development.
The CPI 260 is based on the California Psychological Inventory, restructured to focus on
leadership behaviors.

Groves, K. S., McEnrue, M. P., & Shen, W. (2008). Developing and measuring the emotional intelligence of
leaders. The Journal of Management Development, 27(2), 225-250.

Joseph, D. L., & Newman, D. A. (2010). Emotional intelligence: An integrative meta-analysis and cascading
model. Journal of Applied Psychology, 95(1), 54-78.

Judge, T. A., Bono. J. E., Ilies, R. & Gerhardt, M. W. (2002). Personality and leadership: A qualitative and
quantitative review. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87(4), 765-780. https://doi.org/ 10.1037/0021-
9010.87.4.765

Kilmann Diagnostics. (n.d.). Welcome to Kilmann Diagnostics. Retrieved from
Course Syllabus INT 6210 Foundations of International Leadership

http://www.kilmanndiagnostics.com/ Discusses the use of the Thomas Kilmann Conflict Mode
Instrument, a widely used assessment of conflict resolution strategies. The TKI measures five
approaches to addressing conflict situations.

Kouzes, J.M. & Posner, B.Z., (2013, February 22) Leadership Practices Inventory: LPI – Amanda Lopez Individual
Feedback Report. Retrieved from https://managersandleaders.com.au/wp-
content/uploads/2016/12/LPI360Report-Sample.pdf

Kram, K., Ting, S., & Bunker, K. (2002). On-the-job training for emotional competence. Leadership in Action,
22(3), 3-7.

Meinert, D. (2011). Seeing behind the mask. HR Magazine, 56(2), 31 – 37.

Morgeson, F. P., Mumford, T. V., & Campion, M. A. (2005). Coming full circle: Using research and practice to
address 27 questions about 360-degree feedback programs. Consulting Psychology Journal, 57(3), 196-
209. https://doi.org/10.1037/1065-9293.57.3.196

O’Meara, D. P. (1994). Personality tests raise questions of legality and effectiveness. HRMagazine, 39(1), 97-
100.

Ployhart, R., & Holtz, B. (2008). The diversity-validity dilemma: Strategies for reducing racioethnic and sex
subgroup differences and adverse impact in selection. Personnel Psychology, 61(1), 153-172.

Prahalad, C., & Hamel, G. (1990). The core competence of the corporation. Harvard Business Review, 68(3),
79-91.

Riggio, R. E. (2008). Leadership development: The current state and future expectations. Consulting
Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 60(4), 383-392.

Roberts, B. (2011). Close-up on screening. HR Magazine, 56(2), 23 – 29.

Silzer, R. F., & Church, A. H. (2009). The pearls and perils of identifying potential. Industrial and Organizational
Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice, 2(4), 377-412.

TRACOM Group. [TRACOM Group]. (2010, February 3). TRACOM’s SOCIAL STYLE Model HD Version. [Video
file]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/wRBx8IkV-kQ This video from Tracom provides an overview of a
Social Style assessment. *Closed-captioning available.

TRACOM Group. [TRACOM Group]. (2010, February 3). TRACOM’s Versatility & SOCIAL STYLE HD Version.
[Video file]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/6qqfi1A9qac This video from Tracom expands on the
overview of the Social Style assessment to explain the Versatility component of the assessment.
*Closed-captioning available

Wells, S. J. (2003). Who’s next? Creating a formal program for developing new leaders can pay huge dividends,
but many firms aren’t reaping those rewards. HR Magazine, 48(11), 44-64.

Case Study: Leadership Assessment at Robins

on

Insurance Agency

Todd Robinson, president of Robinson Insurance Agency, couldn’t be happier. The

company that Todd’s father, Edger, started thirty years ago is prospering and poised for

future growth. Over the past three years, Robinson Insurance has su

ccessfully

purchased two regional insurance agencies whose owners were ready for retirement.

The acquisitions went smoothly, and the firms merged under Todd’s capable leadership.

The company now has 13 branch offices, in five different cities, in the great

er Portland

metropolitan area. The headquarters office

the site of the original Robinson Insurance

Agency office

is located in the bustling downtown district in Portland, Oregon.

At 56 years old, Todd Robinson has earned a reputation for being a savvy bus

inessman

and a successful entrepreneur. He hopes to acquire at least one other small agency in

the next year

a move that will expand the company by two additional branch offices in

suburban Portland neighborhoods. However, managing the company is beginning

to

consume more and more of Todd’s time and energy

time he would like to spend with

his family. Todd realizes that he needs to identify potential middle and senior

management leaders within the company who can be trained to play a larger role in

both day

to

day and strategic decisions.

Todd knows that selecting individuals to fill future leadership positions will be extremely

critical to the long

term success of the company. He wants to ensure that the individuals

who are identified for growth opportuniti

es have the knowledge, skills and abilities to

move into new middle and senior leadership positions as these positions are created.

He also wants to ensure that the new leaders will possess and exemplify the “Client

First” philosophy that characterizes the

company. Frankly, he has concerns that some

current managers

especially those from the agencies purchased by Robinson

Insurance

may not fully share the company’s values and may only give “lip service” to

the company’s customer

oriented values and practice

s. However, with 13 branch

offices, Todd isn’t as familiar with each manger’s potential as he would like to be.

Thus, Todd has retained your services to help plan an assessment

based professional

development program. The goal of the program is to identify

people within the company

who have the potential for greater levels of responsibility and authority, and then to

invest in these individuals by providing training and other professional growth

opportunities. Todd also wants help creating a succession plan

to position the company

for long

term success, even after he retires in five to eight years.

Case Study: Leadership Assessment at Robinson
Insurance Agency
Todd Robinson, president of Robinson Insurance Agency, couldn’t be happier. The
company that Todd’s father, Edger, started thirty years ago is prospering and poised for
future growth. Over the past three years, Robinson Insurance has successfully
purchased two regional insurance agencies whose owners were ready for retirement.
The acquisitions went smoothly, and the firms merged under Todd’s capable leadership.
The company now has 13 branch offices, in five different cities, in the greater Portland
metropolitan area. The headquarters office—the site of the original Robinson Insurance
Agency office—is located in the bustling downtown district in Portland, Oregon.
At 56 years old, Todd Robinson has earned a reputation for being a savvy businessman
and a successful entrepreneur. He hopes to acquire at least one other small agency in
the next year—a move that will expand the company by two additional branch offices in
suburban Portland neighborhoods. However, managing the company is beginning to
consume more and more of Todd’s time and energy—time he would like to spend with
his family. Todd realizes that he needs to identify potential middle and senior
management leaders within the company who can be trained to play a larger role in
both day-to-day and strategic decisions.
Todd knows that selecting individuals to fill future leadership positions will be extremely
critical to the long-term success of the company. He wants to ensure that the individuals
who are identified for growth opportunities have the knowledge, skills and abilities to
move into new middle and senior leadership positions as these positions are created.
He also wants to ensure that the new leaders will possess and exemplify the “Client
First” philosophy that characterizes the company. Frankly, he has concerns that some
current managers—especially those from the agencies purchased by Robinson
Insurance—may not fully share the company’s values and may only give “lip service” to
the company’s customer-oriented values and practices. However, with 13 branch
offices, Todd isn’t as familiar with each manger’s potential as he would like to be.
Thus, Todd has retained your services to help plan an assessment-based professional
development program. The goal of the program is to identify people within the company
who have the potential for greater levels of responsibility and authority, and then to
invest in these individuals by providing training and other professional growth
opportunities. Todd also wants help creating a succession plan to position the company
for long-term success, even after he retires in five to eight years.

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