Discussion Board • The final reflection paper is to be a minimum of 4 (four) full pages in length, double-spaced and typewritten. • The paper should includ

Discussion Board • The final reflection paper is to be a minimum of 4 (four) full pages in length, double-spaced and typewritten.
• The paper should include what key points they will take with them in the future and how they will apply them in their professional and personal lives juxtaposed with what was learned during the class.
• This paper should dive deep and should show the complete ability to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate the information learned in the class and how it will be integrated into the student’s life. 5TH EDITION

MUSIC
BUSINESS
HANDBOOK
& CAREER GUIDE

DAVID
BASKERVILLE. Ph.D.

Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010

http://www.archive.org/details/musicbusinesshanOObask

MUSIC BUSINESS HANDBOOK & CAREER GUIDE

DAVID BASKERVILLE, Ph.D.
PROFESSOR EMERITUS
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER

5TH EDITION

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MUSIC BUSINESS
HANDBOOK
& CAREER GUIDE

FOREWORD By STAN CORNYN, President
Warner New Media

‘V. >< M ^^-mr;}^^: SHERWOOD PUBLISHING COMPANY Los Angeles Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 90-60569 ISBN 0-933056-06-0 © 1990 Roberta Baskerville; © 1985, 1981, 1978 David Baskerville. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form by any means without the prior written con- sent of the publisher. SHERWOOD PUBLISHING COMPANY RO. Box 85307, Los Angeles, CA 90072 777/s publication is designed to provide accurate and autlioritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. It is sold with the understanding that the publisher is not en- gaged in rendering legal, accounting, or other professional service. If legal advice or other expert assistance is required, the services of a competent professional person should be sought. From the Declaration of Principles jointly adopted by a committee of the American Bar As- sociation and a committee of publishers and associations. Permission from the following sources to reprint photographs and graphic art Is gratefully acknowledged: A&M Records (pp 298, 311); American Stock Photos (p. 136); Ampex Corp. (p. 291); ASCAP (pp 23, 24, 48,); Beri‘^-^’^
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/ never cared much for poverty.
IGOR STRAVINSKY

Did someone say “the music business”? Wliat happened to the art
of music? The shortest possible answer to that question is, “About $40
billion!” — the annount of money swirling worldwide around the art and
business of music today. But the question of what has happened to
musical art in recent times calls for a serious answer, and that is what
this book is all about. We will examine not only the radical changes in
music and its audiences, but set forth in detail just who produces the
music, who “consumes” it, and how the artists and merchants share that
$40 billion.

Art and commerce make very strange bedfellows. This linkage, omni-
present in the late twentieth century, is inherently contradictory, for
musicians and merchants are, in many respects, natural enemies. They
hold generally conflicting views on what music should be and do. But
when communications technology developed into “mass media” in the
1 940s, the artists and the money changers learned how to find accom-
modation. Since World War II, musicians and merchants have been
engaged in a red hot romance, living in sin. Their union has begat count-
less offspring, without benefit of clergy. In recent years, art and com-
merce have been shoved into a kind of shotgun marriage. But this
improbable union will last, not because the parties share an eternal pas-
sion, but because they can …

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